“Sunblock”: a Documentary on Central Oregon Eclipse

It’s been one year to the day since a total solar eclipse swept across the United States, including right here in Central Oregon.

More than 25,000 people from all over Oregon and 39 different countries gathered in Madras after NASA declared that the Central Oregon city was one of the best places in the U.S. to see a total solar eclipse. However, while most of us were looking toward the sky, one documentary filmmaker was more focused on the human reactions to this once in a lifetime event.

That filmmaker, Grant Bentley, has put that story into a documentary called “Sunblock,” which was entered into the Sundance Film Festival. The 16-minute short got such great feedback that Bentley hopes to enter it in more film festival this year.

Central Oregon Daily’s Allison Roecker got a preview of the film, which features some familiar faces.

Solar Eclipse Interactive Map

NASA’s Total Solar Eclipse interactive map is HERE. Find out how much of the solar eclipse you will see if you are out of the totality band.

This interactive Google map shows the path of the Total Solar Eclipse of 2017, Aug 21. The northern and southern path limits are blue and the central line is red. You MUST be somewhere within the central path (between the blue lines) to see the total phase of the eclipse. The eclipse is longest on the central line (red). The yellow lines crossing the path indicate the time and position of maximum eclipse at 10-minute intervals.

The green marker labeled GE is the point of Greatest Eclipse. The magenta marker labeled GD is the point of Greatest Duration. This is the location where the total eclipse lasts the longest along the entire path. (The magenta band on either side of the Greatest Duration marker shows a region where totality lasts within 0.1 seconds of the maximum.) In the case of the 2017 eclipse, the Greatest Duration is 2 minutes 40.2 seconds.

User Directions: Click anywhere on the map to add a red marker. A popup window appears above the marker with the calculated eclipse times and duration of annularity for that location (see explanation of Eclipse Circumstances below). The ‘x’ in the upper right corner of the popup window closes the popup window. Additional markers can be placed anywhere on the map. Move the cursor over a marker to reveal a popup window with the eclipse times for that position. The predictions in the popup window can also be displayed in a new web page via the Eclipse Times Popup button (bottom right).

All the markers can be removed by using the Clear Marker button (below the map). Choose the Large Map check box to produce a bigger map (hint: enlarge the browser window to its maximum size before selecting the Large Map check box). This option is especially useful to users with large monitors.