Gone for good? Evidence signals many jobs aren’t coming back

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stark evidence of the damage the resurgent viral outbreak has caused the U.S. economy could come Friday when the government is expected to report that the pace of hiring has slowed significantly after a brief rebound in the spring.

As the coronavirus continues to transform a vast swath of the economy, it’s becoming evident that millions of Americans face the prospect of a permanent job loss that will force some to seek work with new industries or in new occupations.

If so, that would lead to a slower recovery in the job market than if restaurants, hotels, bars and retail shops were able to fully reopen and recall all their laid-off employees. Few expect that to happen.

On Friday, economists expect the government to report that employers added 1.6 million jobs in July, according to data provider FactSet, and that the unemployment rate declined from 11.1% to a still-high 10.5%.

At any other time, a million or more jobs would constitute an unheard-of increase.

But July’s expected gain would fall way short of June’s 4.8 million increase and would signal that hiring has sharply slowed.

It would also mean that the economy has regained barely 40% of the jobs that fell to the coronavirus.

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